Beauty Store Business

SEP 2018

Beauty Store Business provides solutions for better retailing! New products, industry news, savvy business moves and important trends affecting both brick-and-mortar and online retailers are included in each issue.

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52 September 2018 | beautystorebusiness.com First Honey Denis Watson, founder and researcher "The idea for the First Honey name comes from our company's goal to make natural healing products everyone's first choice. We asked ourselves, 'Why use chemicals on our bodies when nature has provided such an effective, science-backed solution?' Many consumers are in search of natural alternatives to topical antibiotics when treating everyday cuts, scrapes and burns, and we're thrilled to offer the bioactive technology in our medical-grade Manuka honey that makes this treatment so efficacious." MARA Allison McNamara, founder "When I set out to create my line, I had this concept of creating an oil filled with algae actives and superfood plant oils but was a bit stuck on what to call it. I remember the day I picked MARA like it was yesterday. I was on vacation in Istanbul with my family and we were floating on the prettiest deep blue sea, the Sea of Marmara. It was at that moment that I knew MARA was the perfect name for my clean line of algae-infused face oils. MARA also happens to be the last four letters of my last name, McNamara, and means 'sea' in Gaelic, which pays homage to my Irish heritage and citizenship. Our brown algae actives are sourced from the coasts of Ireland and the U.K., so the name also ties back in with our ingredients." Ethique Brianne West, founder and formulator "'Ethique' means ethical in French, which fits well with what we are trying to do and how we run our business. We had to come up with the name in a hurry after we couldn't trademark the name Sorbet (our original name), and Ethique just fit beautifully." SEVEN Haircare Ryan Sieverson, president "Seven is considered a lucky number in many cultures, but more importantly, it is widely considered to be the number of relationships. In the salon and haircare world, nothing is more important than the relationships we build, so 'SEVEN' seemed the ideal match when the doors to our salon first opened. The name continued to prove fateful; our stylists were taught to begin each service with a detailed client consultation based on the seven face shapes, which is now considered our signature standard." Soapwalla Rachel Winard, founder "'Walla' means creator or master in Hindi, so Soapwalla means 'soap master.' A friend of mine dubbed me the 'soap walla,' and I loved the name so much that I decided it was a perfect fit for my brand!" Farouk Systems Dr. Farouk Shami, chairman and founder "CHI, in fact, stands for Cationic Hydration Interlink. CHI's namesake technology signified a fundamental change in the beauty industry; we delivered the first innovation in tools using ceramic, ionic and infrared technologies–both for health and safety reasons. More than just a name, CHI means energy, which is only fitting since the Cationic Hydration Interlink technology energized sales for the styling iron and blowdryer categories in general. Thanks to that signature technology and the CHI acronym, the brand is now recognized by 95 percent of women in America." Algenist Tammy Yaiser, VP of product development "Algenist means 'the genius of algae,' and our mission is to unlock the secrets of algae, which have the exceptional ability to survive and thrive in the harshest environments on the planet. Responsible for regenerating and protecting algae, patented Alguronic Acid–Algenist's breakthrough ingredient discovery–is naturally sourced and sustainably produced. Algenist offers measurable and visible skin transformation in 10 days and is committed to clean and safe formulas, leveraging biotechnology and the best of nature and science–without compromise." True Moringa Emily Cunningham, cofounder "When we first started working in Ghana in 2013, farmers weren't cultivating moringa trees because they had no way to earn an income from the crop; there was no access to a guaranteed market. So we took the unused part of the tree–the seeds–back to our labs at MIT and figured out how to cold press them locally into moringa oil. ... We set out to build the definitive moringa oil brand–to do what Moroccanoil did for argan oil's popularity. We wanted a name that conveyed the simplicity and transparency of our supply chain and advertised moringa oil as the hero ingredient; thus, True Moringa was born."

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