Beauty Store Business

NOV 2017

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42 November 2017 | beautystorebusiness.com ith the winter months upon us, the weather is getting colder—and the air is getting dryer. Of course, the seasonal weather change has an impact on our skin, which may call for a change in our skincare routines. Let's take a look at what this means in terms of the moisturizers your customers use and the type of moisturizers you sell. DEHYDRATED VS. DRY SKIN Dr. Tina Alster, director of the Washington Institute for Dermatologic Laser Surgery, provided her insights about the differences between dry and dehydrated skin. This is indeed the first conversation to have with your cus- tomers, as there is often confusion surrounding the two. Dr. Alster says, "In a nutshell, dehydrated skin lacks water and dry skin lacks oil. To hydrate the skin, one has to increase its water content. This cannot be accom- plished by simply drinking a lot of water (since most of the water passes through the kidneys and out of the body). Instead, it's best to hydrate the skin topically in order to increase the amount of water in the skin cells." In order to moisturize the skin, there are a few key ingredients your customers should look to. "Topical ingre- dients such as hyaluronic acid, which are humectants, help to bind water and retain moisture," Dr. Alster says. "To moisturize the skin, it is best to avoid products or activities (e.g., scrubbing) that remove excess oil. The best moisturizers are lightweight and do not block pores." Another key difference is that dehydrated skin is typically considered a skin condition (meaning it can be changed and improved), whereas dry skin is a skin type, and cannot be changed—but can be treated. DIGGING DEEPER "To understand dehydrated versus dry skin, you have to understand the stratum corneum," says Dr. Luigi Polla, owner of Forever Institut in Geneva, Switzerland. "The stratum corneum is the topmost layer of skin, and is mostly made up of keratinocytes that are at the end of their lifecycle, known as corneocytes." This layer is about 30 percent water. Dr. Polla says, "Thirty percent may sound like a lot, but it is actually a low percentage compared to the rest of the skin's layers, which are composed of 80 percent water." Avoiding dehydrated skin partially has to do with maintaining and protecting the water content in the stra- tum corneum by ensuring that it does not evaporate too quickly—something known as transepidermal water loss. Dehydrated skin is typically caused by the skin's inability to maintain water content because the skin's barrier is somehow compromised and the natural water content evaporates more quickly than it should. Dry skin, on the other hand, is typically caused by the skin's incapacity to produce enough oil; the sebaceous glands aren't fully doing their job. "I usually think of dehydrated skin as affecting primar- ily younger skin," Dr. Polla says. "Indeed, mature skin is rather dry than dehydrated, as sebum production naturally decreases with age, when the activity of sebaceous glands slows." This is a particularly important point to remember Skincare Spotlight Dehydrated Skin or Dry Skin? Dermatologists explain the nuances of each—and provide expert tips for keeping skin moisturized this winter. By Ada S. Polla Courtesy of Ada S. Polla "To moisturize the skin, it is best to avoid products or activities that remove excess oil. The best moisturizers are lightweight and do not block pores." –Dr. Tina Alster EVERYDAY ROUTINES Recommend these go-to skincare regimens for those with dehydrated or dry skin. DEHYDRATED SKIN 1. Start with a gentle, creamy, non-foaming cleanser that does not contain any surfactants. 2. Follow with a morning hydrator containing ceramides. 3. At night, apply a cream containing natural oils, such as primrose or sunflower oil. DRY SKIN 1. Start with a gentle, creamy, non-foaming cleanser that does not contain any surfactants. 2. Follow with a morning hydrator containing hyaluronic acid. 3. Apply an evening cream containing lipids, such as jojoba and vitamin E.

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